Who is required to carry cargo insurance?

It's important to carry cargo insurance.

While all motor carriers must carry a limited amount of liability insurance, this is only the basic requirement and it offers no protection for the goods you carry. You need to carry cargo insurance to guard against financial loss from damage to your cargo while in transit or storage. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requires truckers who transport household goods and freight forwarders of household goods to carry at least a minimum amount of cargo insurance in case the load becomes damaged or destroyed due to situations beyond the trucker’s control.

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What’s the difference: Motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder authority

Find out how a motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder are different.

Do the terms you hear used in the trucking industry sometimes make it seem like people are speaking a foreign language? They aren’t, of course, but it never hurts to seek clarity to ensure that you’re following all rules depending on the type of trucking business you operate or who you work under. The terms motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder authority can become especially confusing when you’re new to the business.

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Auto liability and cargo insurance as a car hauler with my own authority

It's important to have the right car hauler insurance.

Driving a commercial truck like a car hauler under your own authority is an exciting step in your career. You want to do everything right and may wonder if you need to carry larger amounts of auto liability insurance and cargo insurance now that you are no longer leased to a motor carrier. The answer to this question is a definite yes.

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What are the different types of commercial driver’s licenses?

It's important to have the right commercial driver's license.

The ongoing trucker shortage has led companies of all sizes to actively recruit and hire new drivers – at attractive and appealing rates. In order to secure one of those jobs, though, you need to get your commercial driver’s license, or CDL. Learning more about the different types of commercial drivers licenses makes it easy to determine your training path and make the most effective and efficient decisions for your career.

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What’s the difference: Actual cash value vs. stated limit for trucks

There's a difference between actual cash value insurance and stated limit insurance.

You’ve done everything right – your drivers are experienced, careful and well-trained, your trucks are well-maintained and up-to-date and everyone is complying with regulatory laws – but you still had an accident. It happens to everyone eventually, and it’s why you have commercial coverage for your fleet of trucks and vans anyway. Learning more about the insurance process can help you get through the aftermath of an accident and move forward.

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Can I use bobtail liability insurance to get my tags?

You probably won't be able to get your tags with only bobtail liability insurance.

The term bobtail typically means that a truck has no trailer attached to it. However, it can also refer to a truck hauling an empty trailer. If you work for an employer, that company typically provides primary liability coverage while you are delivering the goods. Since this policy does not cover the times when you are driving but not delivering goods, it is a good idea to obtain bobtail liability insurance for these situations.

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How do I get a CDL?

Planning to get a CDL

With soaring demand for truck drivers comes a wonderful opportunity. For those who have a CDL, finding a good paying job with a great employer is easier than ever before. To access the opportunity, though, you’ll need to have a Commercial Driver’s License or CDL. While each state varies, the training, amount of time it takes to qualify, and the process is similar.

Read moreHow do I get a CDL?

What is the difference between a surplus lines and an admitted carrier?

Admitted carriers are different than surplus lines carriers.

Surplus lines and admitted carriers both do the same thing – they provide insurance coverage for fleets and commercial vehicles. The differences between the two have to do with licensing, rates, and coverage options. Surplus lines coverage is designed for those users who can’t access traditional coverage (via admitted carriers) and features higher fees and more complex application and claims processes. We’ll explain the difference between the two.

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What is the ELD rule and who is exempt from it?

Find out about the ELD rule and the few exemptions.

Congress passed a bill in 2012 that increased qualifications to receive federal highway funding. Known as MAP-21, or Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st century, the bill required the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) to make it mandatory for commercial truckers to maintain an electronic logging device (ELD) – in other words, the ELD rule.

Read moreWhat is the ELD rule and who is exempt from it?