How can a carrier improve in the Unsafe Driving BASIC?

You can improve in the Unsafe Driving BASIC.

Unsafe driving is one of the seven categories of the Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Category (BASIC) created and monitored by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). BASIC uses data from all seven categories to rank drivers against others who have a similar number of safety events. These can include violations, accidents, or poor inspection results.

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How does the Safety Measurement System handle crashes where the motor carrier is NOT at fault?

How does a not at fault accident affect a truck business?

On March 29, 2019, the secretary of the Department of Transportation (DOT) announced that the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) scores of commercial truck drivers would undergo a significant change starting in August 2019. According to Secretary Elaine Chao, points from a crash in which commercial drivers are not at fault will no longer count against them for CSA scoring purposes. Instead, the organization will classify the accident as non-preventable.

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How can I improve my Vehicle Maintenance BASIC?

Improving your Vehicle Maintenance BASIC

Proper vehicle maintenance is one of seven factors that inspectors from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Category (BASIC) program evaluate to assign scores for the Compliance, Safety, and Accountability (CSA) initiative. The goal of the program is to prevent accidents, spillage, and other events that endanger public safety. We’ll go over how you can improve your Vehicle Maintenance BASIC.

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Why did my CSA percentile increase?

Your CSA percentile could worsen for several reasons.

To help identify drivers for intervention, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) uses a ranking system managed by its Compliance, Safety & Accountability (CSA) program. It can be distressing as a driver to see your percentile rank increase from one month to the next, especially if you don’t understand the reason for it. We discuss some of the most common reasons for a CSA percentile increase below.

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Which carriers are included in the Safety Measurement System?

The SMS includes certain motor carriers.

According to the Safety Measurement System (SMS), a program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), five million people are employed as commercial truck and bus drivers in the United States. Drivers of these large commercial vehicles share the same roads as more than 250 million Americans using their own personal vehicle. The FMCSA counts on the SMS to intervene with drivers who demonstrate potentially unsafe behavior.

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How can truck drivers view their safety data?

You can request a safety data report.

As a commercial bus or truck driver, it’s in your best interest to know the information contained in your safety record. Monitoring your own performance allows you to be proactive with correcting issues before the Compliance, Safety & Accountability (CSA) division of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) selects you for intervention. We’ll explain how you can obtain a copy of your safety data below.

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Can I challenge the results of an FMCSA inspection?

You can challenge the results of an FMCSA inspection.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) conducts periodic roadside inspections of commercial trucks and buses to ensure public safety. Any violation on your record with the FMCSA can have a negative impact on your career as well as single you out for further intervention from the agency’s Compliance, Safety & Accountability (CSA) program. What if you want to challenge the result of an FMCSA inspection? We’ll explain.

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What are the three forms of CSA intervention?

There are different levels of CSA intervention.

Compliance and Safety Accountability (CSA) is a program of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) for the purpose of helping motor carriers comply with federal regulations. It institutes three levels of intervention known as Early Contact, Investigation, and Follow-On. CSA interventions help to determine the reason for safety issues and recommend solutions to correct them. It also issues penalties to non-compliant motor carriers. Below is a brief description of each of these forms of CSA intervention.

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What medical criteria are required to obtain a medical certificate? (And who needs one?)

Drivers of commercial vehicles need to get a medical certificate.

Drivers of commercial motor vehicles must undergo a physical examination to make sure they are medically fit for duty. If the truck driver passes the medical exam, the examiner will complete a medical examiner’s certificate, which can be submitted to the Department of Transportation. Below is some information to help you understand this certificate and determine whether you need it.

Read moreWhat medical criteria are required to obtain a medical certificate? (And who needs one?)

What do I do if I get a warning letter from the FMCSA?

Here's what to do if you get an FMCSA warning letter.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is responsible for making sure that commercial trucks and drivers are safe enough to be on America’s highways. To protect the public, the FMCSA completes regular inspections of equipment, driver log books, records of violations, and more. If your business is found to have a violation, the FMCSA will then notify the motor carrier of violations by mail in the form of a warning letter.

Read moreWhat do I do if I get a warning letter from the FMCSA?