Who is required to carry cargo insurance?

It's important to carry cargo insurance.

While all motor carriers must carry a limited amount of liability insurance, this is only the basic requirement and it offers no protection for the goods you carry. You need to carry cargo insurance to guard against financial loss from damage to your cargo while in transit or storage. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requires truckers who transport household goods and freight forwarders of household goods to carry at least a minimum amount of cargo insurance in case the load becomes damaged or destroyed due to situations beyond the trucker’s control.

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What’s the difference: Motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder authority

Find out how a motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder are different.

Do the terms you hear used in the trucking industry sometimes make it seem like people are speaking a foreign language? They aren’t, of course, but it never hurts to seek clarity to ensure that you’re following all rules depending on the type of trucking business you operate or who you work under. The terms motor carrier, broker, and freight forwarder authority can become especially confusing when you’re new to the business.

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What’s the difference: Actual cash value vs. stated limit for trucks

There's a difference between actual cash value insurance and stated limit insurance.

You’ve done everything right – your drivers are experienced, careful and well-trained, your trucks are well-maintained and up-to-date and everyone is complying with regulatory laws – but you still had an accident. It happens to everyone eventually, and it’s why you have commercial coverage for your fleet of trucks and vans anyway. Learning more about the insurance process can help you get through the aftermath of an accident and move forward.

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How do I get a CDL?

Planning to get a CDL

With soaring demand for truck drivers comes a wonderful opportunity. For those who have a CDL, finding a good paying job with a great employer is easier than ever before. To access the opportunity, though, you’ll need to have a Commercial Driver’s License or CDL. While each state varies, the training, amount of time it takes to qualify, and the process is similar.

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What is the ELD rule and who is exempt from it?

Find out about the ELD rule and the few exemptions.

Congress passed a bill in 2012 that increased qualifications to receive federal highway funding. Known as MAP-21, or Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st century, the bill required the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) to make it mandatory for commercial truckers to maintain an electronic logging device (ELD) – in other words, the ELD rule.

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3 things to consider before adding a new vehicle to your fleet

If you add a new vehicle to your fleet, consider your insurance coverage.

Adding a new truck, van, or even a company car to your fleet can solve many problems, save you time, and allow you to scale up your operations, provided you are truly ready to make the switch. Before you upgrade, consider the following questions to be sure you are ready and that you will be able to get the best possible return on your truck investment.

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What are hours of service regulations for trucking?

You need to heed the Hours of Service regulations.

Hours of service regulations are designed to keep the roadways safe for all parties, from motorcycles to big rigs, and to help drivers stay healthy and alert. Hours of service rules are defined by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and must be adhered to in all 50 states. Learning more about these important regulations helps protect your business (new fleet owners and drivers in particular need to fully review hours of service rules) and keeps the roads safe for all.

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What insurance coverage do I need to get my truck tags?

The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) in every state requires both personal and commercial vehicles to obtain truck tags for license plates on an annual basis. The amount that drivers must pay for these truck tags depends on several factors, including age and type of the vehicle. Just as drivers of personal vehicles must prove they have minimum liability insurance, the same is true of commercial truckers. You will need to demonstrate that you have primary liability coverage to drive a commercial truck as required by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).

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What is the minimum insurance I need to get my truck operating authority?

If you're getting your operating authority, you need to have certain levels of insurance.

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), commercial trucking companies must obtain an interstate operating authority number if they meet certain criteria. The interstate operating authority number, also known as an MC number, is in addition to the requirement of obtaining a Department of Transportation (DOT) number.

These criteria include businesses that:

  • Transport people paying a monetary fee or another form of compensation while engaged in interstate commerce. This fee can either be a direct or indirect form of payment.
  • Transport commodities regulated by the federal government and owned by another party in exchange for a direct or implied payment while completing the act of interstate commerce.

Read moreWhat is the minimum insurance I need to get my truck operating authority?